quarta, 20. novembro 2013 – 13:00 horas

Semester research of ETH Studio Basel - BELO HORIZONTE

ETH STUDIO BASEL
Prof. Roger Diener, Prof. Marcel Meili, Christian Müller Inderbitzin, Liisa Gunnarsson, Mathias Gunz, Vesna Jovanovic

COLLABORATION BR
PUC Minas, UFMG

LANGUAGE
EN

LOCATION
Brasilea Stiftung Westquaistrasse 39, 4019 Basel

TIME 
13:00h Welcome words (SB+Brasilea)
13:15h
01 Production and Location (Betim and Contagem) 13:45h
02 Urban Planning, Mining and Ecology (Vetor Norte) 14:15h
commentary
14:30h
03 The Mining Landscape (Quadrialtero Ferrifero) 15:00h
04 Mining and Real Estate (Nova Lima)
15:30h commentary short coffee break
16:00h
05 Art, Mining and Agriculture (Inhotim) 16:30h
06 Centrality, Mobility and Real Estate (Metropolitan Core)
17:00h commentary
17:15h
07 Cultivation and Urbanization (Cerrado) 17:45h
08 Water and Urban Growth (New Betim)
18:15h commentary
18:30h Apéro

CONTACT
Brasilea Foundation Daniel Faust      daniel.faust@brasilea.com
ETH Studio Basel Vesna Jovanovic     jovanovic@arch.ethz.ch

BRIEF INTRODUCTION INTO THE RESEARCH FOCUS

There is a lot of myth and mystery surrounding Brazilís interior: exotic coffee plantations and African slaves brought by the Portuguese to work the land, a bastion of oxygen in the Amazonas threatened by the contemporary land grabbing hype pushed on by 'agri-businessmen', a masterpiece of modernist urban planning embodied in the national capital of Brasilia, the first historical gold rush that brought the Europeans inland to begin with (even today Brazil still concentrates on its extensive coast).

 

But how does one make a hub to open up the harsh countryside? What brings people to such (then) remoteness to form a metropolis? Belo Horizonte, now the capital of the state of Minas Gerais, a land named after the discovery of multiple riches in ore (gold, diamond, iron and steel) was supposed to unite a variegated and impoverished group of smaller regions (the colonial gold rush being a thing of the past), grow up to 300 000 people, and steer economic development by channeling federal funds in concentrated and planned out phases. It is Brazilís original planned capital, inaugurated 60 years before even the idea of Brasilia in 1890, and at the beginning it was just that: a minor administrative township. But the Belorizontinos thought bigger, and created an explosion through globalism, by inviting immense foreign capital to spur on their industrialization. Truly an example of 'tropical capitalism', that has managed to catch up to São Paulo, and overtake Rio, economically. All in the unlikeliest of places.

 

The studio will investigate:

1 How do Brazilians make a capital

investigation will also focus on the overall planning tradition, on the significance of 'Western' influence

2 What is the Brazilian productive landscape, and what are the attitudes towards the land

relationship of city and landscape, treatment of resources, management and ownership

3 What is urban Brazil, besides a story about the gated rich and the favela poor

economy, mobility, culture of people